Home News S.F.’s Mission District has had 649 affordable homes open in two years. Is it having an impact?

S.F.’s Mission District has had 649 affordable homes open in two years. Is it having an impact?

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To outsiders, the fashionable new building in San Francisco’s Mission District may look like the latest wave of condos and rentals for young professionals who have long been drawn to the neighborhood.

But that’s not the case. Over the last two years, several smaller 20- or 30-unit market-priced buildings have opened, but all larger new mission district complexes have been subsidized for affordable housing. increase. Moving families working in outlying areas — Lost about 8,000 Latin families between 2010 and 2020.

Over the last two years, the mission has seen six new affordable projects totaling 649 units and development worth about $ 400 million. This includes the 1296 Shotwell premium building. A family complex at 490 South Van Ness Ave., 2828 16th St., 1950 Mission St., 2060 Folsom St. and a small 45-unit building at 303124th St.

Currently, affordable homebuilders Mission Economic Development Corp. and Tenderloin Neighborhood Development Corp. have completed 130 units in their latest nearby project, 691 Florida St.

The Florida Street building lease has not yet been signed, but the mayor’s Department of Housing and Community Development has received 7,681 applications from prospective tenants. This is about 60 per available apartment. Of the applicants, 1,156 are eligible for the city’s neighborhood priority program. That is, they live in Supervisor District 9 and cover Mission, Portora and Burnal Heights.

The 2060 Folsom Community Gardens in San Francisco’s Mission District has 127 apartments for families and transitional youth.

Scott Strazante / Chronicle

According to Hillary Ronen, the overwhelming demand and long-term potential to land the unit indicate that the mission is at risk of losing the working class, primarily the Latin community. .. A person who serves the district, including the mission.

“In 5 to 10 years, 30 years of gentrification cannot be undone. It takes time,” says Ronen. “We can’t stop proclaiming victory. It’s still possible to lose the personality of our neighbors with a heartbeat.”

With 130 units of the Florida Street Building scheduled to open in the fall, the number of permanently affordable units opening nearby from early 2020 will increase to 779. Three more projects are underway: Approximately 300 units on Mission Street in 1979. , 1515 South Van Ness sells 157 units and 2205 Mission sells 63 condos below market price. All of these are expected to begin construction in 2023 and 2024.

As is often the case in San Francisco, mission housing politics, non-profit and commercial, grant and privately funded give-and-take, is complex and often fragmented. It was like the mission-based community group Poder Organization that upset market rate projects in both the 1979 mission and the 1515 South Vannes, eventually forcing developers to look for other options. It was the opposition of a fierce community led primarily by Latin-dominated groups.

However, the properties of the 1296 Shotwell, 681 Florida, 1979 missions were transferred to the city by market-priced developers to meet the city’s affordable housing requirements.

Antonio Diaz, Poder’s organizational director, said the movement to protect land from free private development has created not only housing, but also parks and open spaces for community organizations like him. Poder has a bicycle repair training facility in the 1950 Mission and will move to the space of 2060 Folsom.

Just south of 2060 Folsom St. in San Francisco, Chan Kaajal Park has become a popular public space in the mission district.

Just south of 2060 Folsom St. in San Francisco, Chan Kaajal Park has become a popular public space in the mission district.

Scott Strazante / Chronicle

The 2060 Folsom building overlooks the Community Gardens and Inchanka Ajar Park, which means “Little Town” in the Maya.

“For Poder, this project is particularly satisfying, because in the early 2000s we fought teeth and nails to rezone the area into open space,” says Diaz. “For the inhabitants who have organized for decades, this is a big win.”

Many of the mission’s new, affordable homes Mission Action Plan 2020Passed in 2017, after a year of moratorium on market rate development.

Rich Hillis, a planning director who was on the planning committee when the Mission 2020 plan was passed, said the goal was to stop “seeing neighboring projects for each project and competing for each.” Stated.

Folsom Street has seen a surge in affordable homes over the last two years.

Folsom Street has seen a surge in affordable homes over the last two years.

Scott Strazante / Chronicle

“The community has demanded that the city take a holistic view of the neighborhood, including small businesses, cultural districts, PDRs (production, distribution, repair), artist spaces, etc.,” he said. “It was to keep small businesses on Mission Street so that working families had a place to shop, and to keep rent-controlled homes vulnerable to peasant evictions. Check out a lot about 2020. But that doesn’t mean we’re done. Work continues. “

The Neighborhood preferences The program also makes a difference. According to the mayor’s office for housing and community development, the 2828 16th St. building has 39 households with neighborhood preferences, 2060 Folsom with 23 families, and 1296 Shotwell with 24 local preferences. There are 24 in the 490 South Van Ness. ..

More than 1,200 residents have landed new homes, but nonprofits in the Mission District are still building space in some buildings. The new development on Florida Street includes the 10,000-square-foot headquarters of Carnival San Francisco, a mission-based cultural group. Galleria de la Raza, a Latin arts and culture organization, will open on 282816th St. with HOMEY (Homies Organizing the Mission to Empower Youth.).

Two nonprofits, Youth Speaks and First Exposure, have already moved to 2060 Folsom.

The First Exposures organization provides one-on-one mentoring for high school students interested in photography, and provides darkroom equipment, materials, and guidance. The new 4,700-square-foot space features classrooms and darkrooms with 12 enlarger bays, including three accessible to people with disabilities.

Student Yonni Mason hears teacher Jenn Wilson explain the blueprint photography process during a class at First Exposure in San Francisco's Mission District.

Student Yonni Mason hears teacher Jenn Wilson explain the blueprint photography process during a class at First Exposure in San Francisco’s Mission District.

Scott Strazante / Chronicle

“This is the newest darkroom on the West Coast,” said Executive Director Eric Auerbach.

The organization was once on Third Street near the stadium — an inconvenient location for most children in class. Now you can go out and shoot street scenes and get inspiration from the mission’s famous murals.

“It’s the perfect area for us and the perfect building,” Auerbach said. “I feel like there is a real move to bring art and culture back to the mission. It will never be 20 or 30 years ago, but it is the beginning.”

JK Dineen is a staff writer at the San Francisco Chronicle. Email: [email protected] twitter: @sfjkdineen

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