Home News A Lake House Is Nice. A Lake House With Mountain Views Is Even Better.

A Lake House Is Nice. A Lake House With Mountain Views Is Even Better.

by admin
0 comment

When Eric Sprunk announced his retirement as COO,

Nike

In February 2020, he had no qualms about where he would spend most of his time. flathead lake.

Splunk, 58, and his wife, Blair Splunk, 55, recently purchased a seven-bedroom, nine-bath mountain modern-style home with a boat house, barn and guest house on the shores of a crystal-clear lake. built. It is located near snow-capped mountains about 70 miles north of Missoula, Montana and about 11 miles from the small town of Polson.

banner

Then a month later, Covid hit. From the age of 25 he also moved in with his five adult children by age 35 and his three grandchildren, with each family assigned a bedroom and bathroom.

Spranks at the entrance to their property named Nighthawk Lodge on Flathead Lake.


Photo:

Rebecca Stumpf of The Wall Street Journal

“This house was perfect,” says Sprunk, who grew up in Missoula.

Spranks first discovered the property while rowing on Flathead Lake in 2015. Mr. Splunk already owns a house on the other side of the lake, which he purchased and renovated in 2004 and was right next door to his father’s lake house. The sun setting in the north and west. “I didn’t want to end the day in the shade of the dockside,” he says.

They parked the boat on the beach, laid a “for sale” sign flat on the surface, and Mr. Splunk called the listed realtors and said they would pay cash for the four acres of land immediately. ended up paying $1.17 million and then spent about $300,000 on land and driveway improvements.

After holding the land without building for three years, Spranks hired Seattle-based architecture firm Cushing Terrell to design a building on the steep, three-story site. At the top is a large barn where the family holds their weddings (three of his children’s weddings have taken place so far), which cost about $200,000 to build. Further down toward the lake is a 1,800-square-foot, two-bedroom, two-bathroom guest house that cost $700,000 to build.

Hugging the shores of the lake at the bottom of the property and wrapping around a central stone patio and lawn that slopes towards the beach and dock is the 7,000 square foot main house with a 2,300 square foot boathouse. It cost about $4.3 million to build.

The main house seen from the lake cost about $4.3 million to build.


Photo:

Rebecca Stumpf of The Wall Street Journal

The main house has a glass front door that opens onto an opposite glass door entrance, offering panoramic views of the lake and mountains before entering. Except for the loft above the kitchen, everything is on his one floor, flanked by two living spaces. At one end is the primary bedroom and bathroom suite, the office shared by Spranks. At the other end is the guest wing, with his three bedrooms and his three bathrooms, and a dedicated living room area (Mr. Splunk calls it the “rehash room.”) It’s where siblings go to drink and talk).

In between is the enormous main room with 40-foot high ceilings and exposed beams of Douglas fir. An open kitchen with dark oak cabinets and gray tiles and cabinets is next, and there is a long wooden dining table surrounded by furry chairs.The living area has a large stone fireplace. The entire lake-facing space has glass walls and aluminum-clad wooden windows.

There are pops of red in shades of gray stone, black metal and dark wood, including red upholstered outdoor furniture. “They wanted to know from the boat which house was theirs,” says Rhonda Divers, the interior designer. According to Divers, the couple loves to have fun, so the emphasis was on using durable fabrics and furniture to create a home that could accommodate a large group of people at once.

The first thing you encounter upon entering the main house is the bar that takes up the entire wall. The bottles are lined up on shallow, backlit shelves with wooden slatted doors in front. Splunk calls it “sake as art.”

The first thing you encounter upon entering the main house is the bar that takes up the entire wall. The bottles are lined up on shallow, backlit shelves with wooden slatted doors in front. Splunk calls it “sake as art.”


Photo:

Rebecca Stumpf of The Wall Street Journal

In the Boathouse, each of the Spranks has a boat on its rails (a custom wooden Stuncraft for her, a black Mastercraft for him). The side room has a bathroom stall like you’d find in high school and a basket full of markers for guests to write on the walls. Play, party in the boathouse, or sit in a boat on rails in a life jacket. During Covid, they created a pub crawl, with each member of the family setting up a different bar space on the four-acre property.

In the Boathouse, each of the Spranks has a boat on its rails (a custom wooden Stuncraft for her, a black Mastercraft for him).


Photo:

Rebecca Stumpf of The Wall Street Journal

Our annual 4th of July party brings together local friends, out-of-town guests, and children from Portland, Oregon, Seattle, New York, and Amsterdam.

Cushing Terrell’s design principal, architect David Koel, said:

The couple branded their home, Nighthawk Lodge, a combination of their high school’s mascots (he’s the Knights of Hellgate High School in Missoula, she’s the Hawks of Mountlake Terrace High School in Mountlake Terrace, Washington). They had a Nike graphic designer friend design the half-falcon half-knight logo and put it on his shirt and cups.

Now a director of General Mills and Bombardier, Mr. Splunk graduated from the University of Montana with a degree in accounting in 1986, is married and has a father. Community Her volunteer and consultant, Sprunk, graduated from Washington State University in 1988 with a degree in business administration and married a commercial real estate broker in Seattle.

The Splunks first met in 1989, when they were both working for PricewaterhouseCoopers, and one of Splunk’s customers was Nike. In March 1993, he joined Nike, and in 1995 moved to Amsterdam, Nike where he became his CFO of Europe and later General Manager of European Footwear. He moved to the Portland, Oregon headquarters in 2000 and in 2012 he became COO. The two got married in 2013 after divorcing.

Splunk grew up commuting to Flathead Lake every summer, and since they still have friends in the area from 3rd grade through college, they chose Flathead Lake as their second home location. His father lives in a house across the lake. Growing up near Seattle, Splunk spent every summer vacationing at Flathead’s Lake Lodge ranch.

The couple are currently splitting their time between their lake house and their principal Seattle home, a historic mansion they bought in 2020 for $8 million and just renovated for $3 million in the Queen Anne neighborhood.

“It’s the situation in his and her hometowns. We both love both places,” says Sprunk.

Spranks first discovered the property while rowing on Flathead Lake in 2015.


Photo:

Rebecca Stumpf of The Wall Street Journal

Copyright ©2022 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All rights reserved. 87990cbe856818d5eddac44c7b1cdb8

You may also like