Home Agent Prewar Townhouse In Manhattan Sells For $57M

Prewar Townhouse In Manhattan Sells For $57M

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The sale is just the latest in a number of high-end townhouse transactions in the city in recent months, following on the heels of two other $50 million townhouse deals.

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A prewar townhouse on Manhattan’s Upper East Side has sold in an off-market transaction for $57 million, The Wall Street Journal reported.

The sale is just the latest in a number of high-end townhouse transactions in the city in recent months, following on the heels of sales of a Gilded Age mansion for $50 million and a Beau Arts mansion for $50 million.

The 22-foot-wide townhouse was sold to the buyer furnished, which added several million dollars to the price tag, agents involved told The WSJ. The seller was an entity associated with Felice Lasalvia di Clemente, an Italian organic grocery store industry executive, according to records. The records also show that the property was acquired by the entity in 2012 for $16 million. The buyer reportedly works in finance and is based in South Africa.

The deal was completely sourced virtually over FaceTime, Loy Carlos of SERHANT. told The WSJ, and the buyer saw it in person only just before closing. Carlos and Ryan Serhant represented the seller, while Adam Solomon and Assad Masri of Douglas Elliman represented the buyer.

The top half of the property | StreetEasy

Built in 1879 and modified to a Neoclassical style in the 1930s, according to Friends of the Upper East Side Historic Districts, the property spans about 9,200 square feet, not counting the cellar and sub-cellar. It features six bedrooms with ensuite bathrooms, a rooftop terrace, a swimming pool, spa, hammam and gym.

The townhouse was recently completely renovated with Italian artisans completing a number of the home’s finishes,  Carlos told The WSJ. Italian architect Achille Salvagni was also responsible for some of the interiors.

The transaction was drawn out over the course of a year, partly due to the seller’s limited English and partly because the buyer wanted to wait until the renovation was completely finished, Masri told The WSJ.

Email Lillian Dickerson

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